Monthly Archives: September 2013

A Bird’s Eye View of Earth’s Newest Island

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A massive earthquake that tragically killed more than 300 people and destroyed scores of mud huts in southwestern Pakistan on Tuesday also offered a surreal moment of creation. The tremor unleashed an underwater “mud volcano”  that spewed mud and earth to create a new island, half a mile off the coast of the Pakistani port city of Gwadar. This satellite image, published for the first time here, depicts the 200-foot-wide island (and 100 feet high) in the middle of the Arabian Sea.

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Nick Cave’s SoundSuits

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Edwidge Danticat on Using Writing to Reach the Past, Look Forward, Solve Problems (Video)

Repeating Islands

This interview and reading by Edwidge Danticat was posted in the NPR website by Jeffrey Brown.

“Claire of the Sea Light” is a story of death and loss, but also the enduring power of love. The intertwined lives in a small fishing village are upended when a seven-year-old girl disappears. Haitian-born novelist Edwidge Danticat has returned with her first novel in a decade and her first work of fiction about her native country since the 2010 earthquake there.

Danticat is the author of “Krik? Krak!”, “The Dew Breaker” and “Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work,” among others. Danticat joined Jeffrey Brown in our studio Tuesday for a conversation about her new work, her writing practice and Haiti.

You can also watch Danticat read an excerpt from “Claire of the Sea Light”:

For the original report go to http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/entertainment/july-dec13/danticat_09-17.html

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New Book Series: Critical Caribbean Studies

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Puerto Viejo, Colombia, holds first-ever African Diaspora Film Festival

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In attendance were U.S. actors Alfre Woodard and Danny Glover, The Tico Times reports.

The first African Diaspora Film Festival took place in Puerto Viejo on Costa Rica’s southern Caribbean coast this past weekend as part of a yearly celebration of Afro-Costa Rican culture.

The festival drew Hollywood actors such as Alfre Woodard and Danny Glover, as well as international activists from social organizations against discrimination and the war on drugs. The movie “Holiday Heart,” along with documentaries “The House I Live In” and “The War on Drugs” were screened.

A musical group from the Puerto Viejo school, Los Rumberitos, composed of children aged 7-10, performed Aug. 30, and had an impact on actress Alfre Woodard. “You don’t have to worry about maintaining roots of Afro-Costa Rican culture,” she said, referring to the skill of Los Rumberitos.

The activities continued with a screening of the documentary “Caribe Sur: Coast, History…

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Edwidge Danticat: Daughter of Haiti

Repeating Islands

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Set in her native land, Edwidge Danticat’s latest novel is infused with the intensity of two kinds of love – for one’s country and one’s children, Kristin Tillotson writes in this review for The Star Tribune.

Edwidge Danticat has a favorite maxim in her native French Creole. “Piti piti, zwazo fè nich li” means “Little by little, the bird builds its nest.”

“There are so many life lessons in that one short phrase,” she said. “It’s also great for writing, because that’s exactly what you do — build a world, word by word.”

If that’s so, the Haitian-American author has feathered a treeful of nests over the past two decades. After vaulting onto the literary scene at age 25 with “Breath, Eyes, Memory,” Danticat has published several works of fiction and nonfiction, edited two anthologies and racked up awards, including a $500,000 MacArthur genius grant in 2009. In the…

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REVOLUTIONARY REVOLTS, REBELLIONS and REMEMBRANCE MONTH FOR AFRICANS WORLDWIDE

KNIGHTZ' SCRIBE

This bank holiday many people in London will come out to the UK’s biggest street party, the Notting Hill Carnival. Some will play mas, some will come out with family and friends to watch the spectacle of colour, costume and theatre of Afro-Caribbean culture. Whilst many will enjoy the fun and frolics of dancing and  drinking.  How many of us understand the who’s and whys of this magnificent display of culture and arts that brings the summer to sweet end?

Carnival originated as a festival in ancient Egypt which was subsequently celebrated by the Greeks and Romans, it was later adopted by the Catholic Christian church as the festival of Carne (flesh) Vale(farewell), i.e. farewell to the flesh. This was  the last  celebratory feast before Ash Wednesday marking the beginning of Lent.

European enslavers transported the festival to the Caribbean in the 1700s where they held masked balls which was…

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